scott
clyde

An erstwhile 60s pop star-turned-advertising-whiz and the voyages of Captain James Cook are the unlikely partners in an artistic project which has turned into an on-going mission called Waterlines. It began when Clyde Scott, who trained at Ilam Art School in Christchurch in the late 50s before building a 30-year advertising career in Auckland, sold up and decided to go full-circle back to painting.

But having abandoned the arts for so long, he didn't know where to start. "When I first opened my palette, I thought what am I going to paint?" says 65-year-old Scott, the older brother of broadcast veteran Lloyd Scott and father of Youth Theatre-cum-Shortland Street director Sam. "And I also kept wondering: what is the relevance?"

With a work ethic galvanised by deadlines, Scott entered a landscape in the 1991 Central King Country Art Awards - and won a $1000 prize. "That was a starter. Having a deadline, a purpose, and getting some encouragement, that all helped me," he says. "I spent quite a bit of time doing different things to try to find a direction, find some work that was saying something and doing something."

He kept working, steadily exhibiting in North Shore galleries through the 90s - but he was still searching for a subject which really connected his heart and mind. The answer came through a family death. Scott's wife, Carol, is from the Barton family, owners of Barton & Sons Boat builders in St Mary's Bay from 1901 until 1954, when motorway development forced them out. But the Bartons also had a secondary boatbuilding shed in Beachhaven; when Carol's uncle died in the late 90s, the Scotts made a discovery.

"We went in to sort through the stuff in the shed, which was full of wonderful things," recalls Scott, "and that's when I discovered the strakes, the long, thin curved kauri strips which are used to make clinker dinghies."

Charmed by the strakes' elegant shapes and smooth texture, Scott had his raw material, although he didn't know for what purpose except to "maybe make a mobile".

His wife - an anthropology tutor at Auckland University - was again instrumental. Sitting at his kitchen table, Scott opens Carol's battered copy of Professor Anne Salmond's Two Worlds, the fascinating account of the first encounters between Maori and Pakeha from 1642-1772.

The book (which came third in the 1992 Goodman Fielder Wattie Book Awards) includes long, thin coastline drawings by Herman Sporing, Joseph Banks' secretary aboard the Endeavour during its circumnavigation of New Zealand in 1769-70.

And so Waterlines was born, long drawings on the strakes of the coastline charted by Cook, tinted with acrylic and gold text which explains the naming of the place or an event which happened there.

In the wake of Captain Cook (2002) Linda Herrick

in the wake of captain cook

8 Feburary - 3 March 2018

Long, thin, curved kauri strips, called strakes (that are used to make dinghies) are substrates for rendering the long, thin coastal drawings of Herman Sporing, Joseph Banks' secretary aboard the Endeavour during its circumnavigation of New Zealand in 1769-70.

"Waterline #40b"Ship Cove acrylic & pencil on kauri dinghy strake,130 x 3300mm

These beautiful artworks are very difficult to photograph for detail, please view catalogue here

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE